Where Can I Hydrotest My Tank?

Where can I hydro test my tank? Even as a paintball beginner, you already know that at some point, usually between three and five years, you have to hydro test your tank. Hydrotesting the tank keeps you safe in the field.

If your tank is hydro tested, you get a tag that indicates that it is safe for you and the people around you.

Nevertheless, the question remains on where you should have this necessary task.

So, Where Can I Hydrotest My Tank?

Tank hydro-testing centers are available all over, and your paintball store can even recommend the nearest. If you can’t get a local center, you can search online for the nearest stations so that you send your tank over.

Today, most paintball fields also offer hydrostatic testing to their clients. But do not mistake: they never refill out of date tanks, which can land them into trouble.

Why Should I Hydrotest My Paintball Tank Anyway?

Hydrotesting the paintball tank assures you and other players of safety. Even if you think that your tank is perfectly alright, you cannot use it in the paintball field if the hydro date is overdue.

Worse still, you may not have it re-hydro tested if the date is overdue in some states. So, to avoid these challenges, just hydro test your tank when you should. Besides, it’s only once in half a decade, and you have secured your safety.

More importantly, you hydro test a paintball tank to ensure that all the dives, rolls, and crawls in the field did not affect it. We have to agree that paintball tanks are made in optimal integrity and are of very high quality. However, we cannot deny that the wild game can compromise the quality at one point.

Whether you use CO2 or compressed air, aluminum, steel, or carbon fiber tanks, hydro testing is necessary. However, when it just doesn’t make economic sense to hydro test a paintball tank.

For instance, if the tank is CO2, it is more economical to purchase a new tank instead of hydro testing. While hydro-testing may cost you around 40+ dollars, a new tank will not go beyond 50 bucks. So, why not invest in a brand new tank?

Anyway, paintballs last a maximum of 15 years, so you may only have to hydro test it twice, which is quite convenient.

What Does Hydrotesting Involve?

Once you take your tank for hydro testing, several inspections are carried out to clear the tank.

Essentially, the testing party must confirm that the date you bring your tank is not beyond 5 years after the manufacturing date. Usually, the tank will give the date of manufacture, month, and year, and add five years for aluminum tanks. For carbon fiber and glass fiber tanks, you should do a hydro test every three years.

If your tank is within the hydro testing duration,  the hydro test begins.

First off, the testing company will visually inspect every part of the tank from the exterior. Is the pain already scratched off? Don’t worry, as the paint is only for decoration. As long as the main tank is not dented or cracked, your tank will still pass this test. Even a dented tank that is not cracked is still viable.

Secondly, the testing party will look inside the tank, searching for corrosions or anything that could disqualify the tank. If nothing is unusual, your tank will pass on to the next test.

The testing party will fill a larger container with water and then dip the container’s paintball tank. Then, he will put high-pressure water into the paintball tank to test how much it expands. See the REE symbol on your tank? The figure that accompanies it shows how far the tank should expand. If the tank expands beyond this during hydro testing, the tank fails the test.

Finally, your tank will get another visual inspection, now including the regulator and the valve, to see whether they are tight and safe for use.

If everything is in order, the tester will stamp a colored tag that indicates that the tank is hydro tested and safe for the field.

How Often Should I Re-hydro test My Paintball Tank?

You should do a re-hydro every five years for aluminum tanks and every three years for a carbon fiber or glass fiber tank.

For CO2 tanks, you can dispose of them and get a replacement because the replacement could cost as much as the hydro.

However, if you feel that your tank went through a rough time and doubt it could still be safe, go for a hydrotest. Its hydro test time may not be mature, but caution always pays off.

Parting Thoughts

Today you will not struggle to get a hydro-testing center. After all, you may only need the hydro test twice before the tank’s lifespan expires. The best thing would be to start looking for viable re-hydro centers sooner so that you are not in a hurry for research as well as competing with the dates.

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